Social Anxiety Disorder

Social Anxiety Disorder

Individuals with this condition experience an overwhelming fear of being judged or of doing something embarrassing in social situations. The disorder can cause disabling self-consciousness.

Social Anxiety Disorder

What is it?

An individual with social anxiety disorder (also called social phobia) experiences excessive nerves or dread of social situations. They may be anxious only in specific circumstances, such as speaking or performing in public, or experience distress in all social situations.

          The person tends to be extremely self-conscious and worries about others evaluating them negatively. They dwell on past social incidents, obsessing about how they might have come across. Social anxiety causes the person to over plan and rehearse for anticipated situations, which may lead to odd or awkward behavior. Individuals may then gather evidence to support their fears, because difficult situations often arise as a result of the person’s anxiety or over-rehearsal.

          This disorder leads to isolation and depression and can seriously affect social relationships. It can also have a negative impact on performance at work or school.

TREATMENT

Cognitive behavioral therapy (p.125) to recognize and change negative thought patterns and behaviors.

Group therapy for the opportunity to share problems and practice social behavior.

Self-help including affirmations, rehearsing before social events, disprove negative assumptions.

SYMPTOMS BEFORE SOCIAL INTERACTION

The individual may prepare and rehearse excessively in advance, planning topics of conversation or how to present themselves in a specific way.

DURING INTERACTION

Physical symptoms such as trembling, rapid breathing, racing heart, sweating, or blushing occur as the body’s “fight or flight” system is activated. In extreme cases, the person may experience a panic attack.

AFTER INTERACTION

The person conducts a detailed, negative, and self-critical appraisal  of the social situation, dissecting conversations and body language and giving them a negative slant.

This is Taken From How Psychology Works

Written by Arshad. A

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